Adolf Hitler 1924 to 1929

Adolf Hitler 1924 to 1929

From 1924 to 1929, Adolf Hitler, following his experiences at Landsberg Prison, decided that all that he did at a political level would be legal and above board. If he wanted to sell the Nazi dream to the people of Weimar Germany, then he had to be seen as being a legitimate party leader and not one associated with violence and wrong-doing. Hitler's approach was to highlight the failings of the other political parties in Weimar Germany. 

As a policy, it was to fail. Between 1924 and 1929, the Nazis were politically very weak. Their representation in the Reichstag was very low compared to other parties.

Election Year

Communist Party

Social Demos

Democ. Party

Centre Party

Conservatives

Nationalists

Nazis

1919

0

187

75

91

19

44

0

1920

4

186

39

64

65

71

0

May 24

62

100

28

65

45

95

32

Dec 24

45

131

32

69

51

103

14

1928

54

153

25

62

45

73

12

In the three elections held between 1924 and 1928, the Nazis gained fewer seats than the Communist Party and they were the weakest of the main right wing parties. The election campaigns pushed the party to the brink of bankruptcy. If the party had been declared bankrupt, it would have folded.

Weimar Germany from 1924 to 1929 was undergoing a renaissance. The government of Stressemann had got the country back on course after the nightmare of hyperinflation. The Dawes Plan had loaned Germany the necessary money to kick start her economy once again. The industrial heartland of the Ruhr settled down to productivity after the trauma of the French/Belgium invasion. Moderate politicians had won the day and there seemed no place in the new-born Germany for a political party of any extremes - be it from the left or right.

Stressemann had restored Germany's position in Europe. With the support of her previous enemy, France, Germany had entered the League of Nations in 1926. Normality seemed to be in place. Hence the Nazi Party's poor showing at the elections.

Hitler kept to his promise of working within the law. If he did not, it would have looked like an act of political desperation. However, as with any small party, the Nazi Party's funds were limited. Political obscurity beckoned for the Nazis.

They were saved by an event out of their hands - the Wall Street Crash of October 1929. This event was crucial to the Nazis. The Americans called back the money they had loaded Germany in 1924 and 1929 (the Young Plan). Germany had no money to invest in her economy. The growth from 1924 to 1929 had been somewhat of an illusion as a great deal of the money invested had been from overseas loans - primarily America. Money borrowed had to be paid back. In October 1929, Germany was left effectively bankrupt - again.

The impact of the Wall Street Crash took time to impact Germany. Unemployment was not a major issue for 1929. But by September 1930 it was.

September 1928

650,000 unemployed

September 1929

1,320,000 unemployed

September 1930

3,000,000 unemployed

September 1931

4,350,000 unemployed

September 1932

5,102,000 unemployed

January 1933

6,100,000 unemployed

Those unemployed turned to the one party and party leader untainted by the chaos of Weimar Germany.






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